album stream: Good Friend Electrical - Ancient History

From the moment Good Friend Electrical begins you're surrounded. It's an album you can surrender yourself wholly to, letting the band lead you through the noise and into something beautiful. Stream the whole thing below, along with a note from the band and check them out tomorrow at the Wild Kindness '17 KickOff. You can pick your own copy up for free if you attend the show, otherwise you can stream it right here!

It's fair to say that Donald Ducote and Austin Lemieux knew they wouldn't be returning to NYC.  It was the beginning of winter in 2013 and the rents were rising, the music was uninspired, and none of the bars or venues that existed upon their arrival remained at the time of their December departure. Donald bought a van and headed towards the west coast.  That was how 'Good Friend Electrical' started.  It's a record that doesn't end in the same place that it started.  In the aftermath of their debut record 'Tracks' they knew they wanted the follow-up to pick up the pace.  They wanted more drums.  They wanted more noise.  They wanted more electric guitars.  
When they arrived in Donald's hometown of Phoenix they drove around downtown looking for houses with 'for rent by owner' signs in their yards.  Eventually they convinced one homeowner to rent them their house for 1 week in February specifically for recording. He charged them $500 for the whole week.  Ducote rounded up some of his childhood friends including Monique Reina on bass and Nathanial Lewis on drums.  Johnny Kenepaske and John Krause were behind the board. They enlisted James Mulhern of The Gentle Hits and What Laura Says and Ducote's friend Emma Gillespie from the U.K. to smooth out the corners.  What they created was an honest modern rock record that is as pretty as it is jarring.  
Ducote wanted to shelf the mellow influences that made 'Tracks' such a warm, middle of the night record.  He wanted something for the rainy days,  not the snowy nights.  Once most of the tracking had been completed he brought the record to his old friend Chris Kasych in California.  Ducote camped out at Kasych's studio The Handbag Factory for a few weeks and finished off the record. "I wanted to bring the record to life in a place that felt as far away from Brooklyn as I could find".  The Handbag Factory (located on Pico and Grand) in downtown LA was exactly that location.